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Volume 30 | Number 3 | Summer 2005
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Volume 30 | Number 3 | Summer 2005

HEARD MUSEUM 75TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

17 GALLERIES

26 AUCTION BLOCK
by Harmer Johnson

32 MUSEUMS

44 BOOK REVIEW
BLANKET WEAVING OF THE SOUTHWEST by Joe Ben Wheat,
edited by Ann Lane Hedlund. Reviewed by Cheri Falkenstien-Doyle.

48 INTRODUCTION
by Frank Goodyear

50 A SMALL BUILDING TO PUT THINGS IN
by Ann Marshall
In its seventy-fifth anniversary year, that “small building” — the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona — has grown to 125,000 square feet, presenting in its exhibit galleries one of the finest regional collections of native art, numbering more than thirty-two thousand pieces. This article describes the museum’s founding and the collectors and supporters who have built the museum’s collections.

62 NATIVE AMERICAN SILVERSMITHS IN THE SOUTHWEST
by Diana Pardue
Since the late 1800s, store owners in the Southwest have employed Native American silversmiths to demonstrate their work and create jewelry for sale. This article recounts the history of this practice, profiles some better-known silversmiths and presents jewelry, now in the Heard Museum’s collection, by these artists.

70 A BEAUTIFUL RESISTANCE: AMERICAN INDIAN PAINTINGS AT THE HEARD MUSEUM
by Joe Baker
Presents an overview of the Heard Museum’s collection of Native American paintings, which now number around three thousand, and highlights some selected pieces from the collection.

78 THE VOLZ COLLECTION OF HOPI KATSINA DOLLS AT THE HEARD MUSEUM
by Tricia Loscher
Examines the collection of Hopi katsina dolls donated to the Heard Museum by the Fred Harvey Company, which purchased them from Indian trader Frederick William Volz in 1901, and discusses the way in which Volz influenced the making of katsina dolls for the tourist trade.

89 CALENDAR OF SUMMER EVENTS

100 LEGAL BRIEFS
by Ron McCoy

118 ADVERTISER INDEX

 
 
 
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